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Biodegradation in water: screening tests

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Reference
Endpoint:
biodegradation in water: ready biodegradability
Type of information:
calculation (if not (Q)SAR)
Adequacy of study:
key study
Reliability:
2 (reliable with restrictions)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
accepted calculation method
Justification for type of information:
Data is from computational model developed by USEPA
Qualifier:
according to guideline
Guideline:
other: Modeling database
Principles of method if other than guideline:
The Biodegradation Probability Program (BIOWIN) estimates the probability for the rapid aerobic biodegradation of an organic chemical in the presence of mixed populations of environmental microorganisms .The model is part of the EpiSuite program of the US-EPA. Estimations are made with BIOWIN version 4.10. Estimates are based upon fragment constants that were developed using multiple linear and non-linear regression analyses. Experimental biodegradation data for the multiple linear and non-linear regressions were obtained from Syracuse Research Corporation's (SRC) data base of evaluated biodegradation data (Howard et. al., 1987). This version (v4.10) designates the models as follows (see also Boethling et al. 2003):
Biowin1 = linear probability model
Biowin2 = nonlinear probability model
Biowin3 = expert survey ultimate biodegradation model
Biowin4 = expert survey primary biodegradation model
Biowin5 = MITI linear model
Biowin6 = MITI nonlinear model
Biowin7 = anaerobic biodegradation model
GLP compliance:
not specified
Specific details on test material used for the study:
- Name of test material: sodium naphthalene-1-sulfonate
- Molecular formula: C10H7NaO3S
- Molecular weight: 230.218 g/mol
- Smiles notation: c12c(S(=O)(=O)[O-])cccc1cccc2.[Na+]
- InChl: 1S/C10H8O3S.Na/c11-14(12,13)10-7-3-5-8-4-1-2-6-9(8)10;/h1-7H,(H,11,12,13);/q;+1/p-1
- Substance type: Organic
- Physical state: Solid
Oxygen conditions:
other: aerobic (Biowin 1-6) and anaerobic (Biowin 7)
Inoculum or test system:
other: mixed populations of environmental microorganisms
Details on study design:
Using the computer tool BIOWIN v4.10 by US-EPA (EPIWIN) the aerobic as well as the anaerobic biodegradability of the test material can be estimated. The follwoing seven different models are used by the tool: Linear Model, Non-Linear Model, Ultimate Biodegradation Timeframe, Primary Biodegradation Timeframe, MITI LInear Model, MITI Non-Linear Model and Anaerobic Model (calles Biowin 1-7, respectively). Due to this results the overall prediction of readily biodegradability is done for the desired chemical.

Biowin 1 and 2, are intended to convey a general indication of biodegradability under aerobic conditions, and not for any particular medium.
Biowin 1 (Linear model)
The fast biodegradation probability for any compound is calculated by summing, for all the fragments present in that compound, the fragment coefficient multiplied by the number of instances of the fragment in the compound (for MW, the value of that parameter is multiplied by its coefficient), and then adding this summation to the equation constant which is 0.7475. The summed values for each fragment coefficient multiplied by the number of instances appear in the "VALUE" column of the linear results screen.

Biowin 2 (Non-linear model)
Calculation of the fast biodegradation probability for any compound begins by summing, for all the fragments present in that compound, the fragment coefficient multiplied by the number of instances of the fragment in the compound (for MW, the value of that parameter is multiplied by its coefficient), then adding this summation to the equation constant which is 3.0087. The summed values for each fragment coefficient multiplied by the number of instances appear in the "VALUE" column of the non-linear results screen. The non-linear fast biodegradation probability is then calculated from the logistic equation as follows, where total = 3.0087 + the summation as described above:

Biowin 3 and 4 yield estimates for the time required to achieve complete ultimate and primary biodegradation in a typical or "evaluative" aquatic environment.

Biowin 5 and 6 are predictive models for assessing a compound’s biodegradability in the Japanese MITI (Ministry of International Trade and Industry) ready biodegradation test; i.e. OECD 301C. These models use an approach similar to that used to develop Biowin1 and 2. This protocol for determining ready biodegradability is among six officially approved as ready biodegradability test guidelines of the OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development). A total dataset of 884 chemicals was compiled to derive the fragment probability values that are applied in this MITI Biodegradability method. The dataset consists of 385 chemical that were critically evaluated as "readily degradable" and 499 chemicals that were critically evaluated as "not readily biodegradable".

Biowin 7, the anaerobic biodegradation model, is the most recent. As for the other Biowin models, multiple (linear) regression against molecular fragments was used to develop the model, which predicts probability of rapid degradation in the "serum bottle" anaerobic biodegradation screening test. This endpoint is assumed to be predictive of degradation in a typical anaerobic digester. Biowin7 estimates the probability of fast biodegradation under methanogenic anaerobic conditions; specifically, under the conditions of the "serum bottle" anaerobic biodegradation screening test (Meylan et al. 2007). A total of 169 compounds with serum bottle test data were identified for use in model development.

Out of seven different Biowin models, Biowin model 3 and 4 will help in estimating biodgeradability of the test chemical which was described as below-

Ultimate Biodegradation Timeframe and Primary Biodegradation Timeframe (Biowin 3 and 4)
These two models estimate the time required for "complete" ultimate and primary biodegradation.  Primary biodegradation is the transformation of a parent compound to an initial metabolite.  Ultimate biodegradation is the transformation of a parent compound to carbon dioxide and water, mineral oxides of any other elements present in the test compound, and new cell material. Then the rating was given to each model, which indicates the time required to achieve ultimate and primary biodegradation in a typical or "evaluative" aquatic environment. The ratings for each compound were averaged to obtain a single value for modeling.  The ultimate or primary rating of a compound is calculated by summing, for all the fragments present in that compound.
Key result
Parameter:
probability of ready biodegradability (QSAR/QSPR)
Remarks on result:
other: not readily biodegradable as estimated by BIOWIN model
Validity criteria fulfilled:
not specified
Interpretation of results:
not readily biodegradable
Conclusions:
The biodegradability of the substance was calculated using seven different Biowin 1-7 models of the BIOWIN v4.10 software. The results indicate that the test chemical sodium naphthalene-1-sulfonate is expected to be not readily biodegradable.
Executive summary:

Estimation Programs Interface Suite (EPI suite, 2018) was run to predict the biodegradation potential of the test compound   sodium naphthalene-1-sulfonate (CAS no.  130- 14 -3 ) in the presence of mixed populations of environmental microorganisms. The biodegradability of the substance was calculated using seven different models such as Linear Model, Non-Linear Model, Ultimate Biodegradation Timeframe, Primary Biodegradation Timeframe, MITI Linear Model, MITI Non-Linear Model and Anaerobic Model (called as Biowin 1-7, respectively) of the BIOWIN v4.10 software. The results indicate that chemical  sodium naphthalene-1-sulfonate is expected to be not readily biodegradable.

Description of key information

Estimation Programs Interface Suite (EPI suite, 2018) was run to predict the biodegradation potential of the test compound   sodium naphthalene-1-sulfonate (CAS no.  130- 14 -3 ) in the presence of mixed populations of environmental microorganisms. The biodegradability of the substance was calculated using seven different models such as Linear Model, Non-Linear Model, Ultimate Biodegradation Timeframe, Primary Biodegradation Timeframe, MITI Linear Model, MITI Non-Linear Model and Anaerobic Model (called as Biowin 1-7, respectively) of the BIOWIN v4.10 software. The results indicate that chemical  sodium naphthalene-1-sulfonate is expected to be not readily biodegradable.

Key value for chemical safety assessment

Biodegradation in water:
under test conditions no biodegradation observed

Additional information

Predicted data study for target chemical sodium naphthalene-1-sulfonate(CAS no.  130- 14 -3) and experimental studies for its structurally similar read across chemical have been conducted and their results are summarized below for biodegradation in water endpoint.

 

In first study the Estimation Programs Interface Suite (EPI suite, 2018) was run to predict the biodegradation potential of the test compound Sodium naphthalene-1-sulfonate (CAS no.  130- 14 -3) in the presence of mixed populations of environmental microorganisms. The biodegradability of the substance was calculated using seven different models such as Linear Model, Non-Linear Model, Ultimate Biodegradation Timeframe, Primary Biodegradation Timeframe, MITI Linear Model, MITI Non-Linear Model and Anaerobic Model (called as Biowin 1-7, respectively) of the BIOWIN v4.10 software. The results indicate that chemical Sodium naphthalene-1-sulfonate is expected to be not readily biodegradable.

 

Next study was experimental study reviewed from journal Water research (1976) in this study a batch test in an open system was conducted for 5 days for evaluating the biodegradability of test chemical. Adapted activated sludge was used as a test inoculum obtained from a sewage plant is cultivated in a 1000ml volumetric cylinder. The mixture is aerated with pressure air. Every day 200 ml of the mixture is driven off so that the sludge age is 5 days. After driving off the 200ml of the mixture aeration is interrupted, and after sedimentationca.600 ml of the liquid phase is driven off. The residue (200 ml of the thickened activated sludge) is diluted with tap water to the volume ofca.800 ml and 600 mg/l of starch or glucose, 600 mg/l of peptone, 25 ml of a phosphate buffer pH 7.2, and the solution of the tested compound are added. Then the mixture in the cylinder is made up to 1000ml with tap water and aerated for 23 h (the recirculation ratio is 0-25). After this period the procedure is repeated. Test chemical conc. used for the study was 200 mg/l based on COD. To 1000-1500ml of the biological medium such amount of the solution of the substance tested is added that the initial COD is 200 mg/l. Then such an amount of the adapted activated sludge, washed and thickened by sedimentation, is dosed tothe medium that the concentration of the dry matter is 100 mg/l. Simultaneously, a blank test is prepared. The beaker was placed in a dark room with a roughly 3 constant temperature of 20±3°C on an electromagnetic stirrer and a pH of 7.2 for 120 hrs. The initial value of COD or organic carbon of the liquid phase was determined. Samples were filtered or centrifuged before analysis, are taken at suitable intervals. The decrease of the tested substance in the liquid phase is evaluated by determining COD or organic carbon. The results are compared with those of a blank test and standard compound decomposition. With the degree of degradation also the average specific rate of degradation is determined, expressed in terms of mg COD (or organic carbon) removed by a gramme of dry matter of the activated sludge per hour. The percentage degradation of test chemical was determined to be 0% degradation by COD parameter in 5 days. Thus, based on percentage degradation, test substance was considered to be not readily biodegradable in nature.

 

Another experimental study was reviewed from journal The Science of the Total Environment (1995) in this Biodegradation experiment was conducted for 28 days for evaluating the percentage biodegradability of test substance by bacteria as a test inoculum. Seeding bacteria was used as a test inoculum. The seeding bacteria had been cultured in a continuous anaerobic bioreactor at 37 + 1°C. Synthetic sewage, composed of glucose, peptone and corn steap liquor (carbon ratio = 1:1:2), is supplied into the reactor (3.0 g-C/l, 8.0 g-CS./.d). In this culture, > 95% acidic decomposition and > 90% methanogenic decomposition are achieved. A standard test and low conc. tests using 50 ml vials (total capacity: 68 ml) was employed. Ten test vials were prepared under the same conditions, and they were set in a water bath at 37°C ± 0.5”C. The original solution was added to the test inoculum and organic medium in oxygen-free water. At the starting time and after every week, two vials were opened simultaneously, and the concentration of organic compound was analyzed. The concentration of organic compound was determined by dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the standard test and by chromatography in low conc. test. Biodegradation ratio is determined by analysing the decrease of DOC in the standard test. The percentage degradation of the test compound was determined to be < 30% degradation by DOC removal, chromatography in 28 days by using standard test and low conc. test. Thus, based on the percentage degradation, the test chemical was considered to be not readily biodegradable in nature.

 

Next both the studies are also experimental studies reviewed from authoritative database (J check, 2018)

 

In first study the biodegradation experiment was conducted for 14 days for evaluating the percentage biodegradability of test substance. Concentration of inoculum i.e, sludge used was 30 mg/l and initial test substance conc. used in the study was 100 mg/l, respectively. The percentage degradation of test substance was determined to be 0 and < 0% by BOD, O2 consumption, TOC removal, test mat. analysis and UV-Vis parameter in 14 days. Thus, based on percentage degradation, test chemical is considered to be not readily biodegradable in nature.

 

In another study the Biodegradation experiment was conducted for 14 days for evaluating the percentage biodegradability of test substance. The study was performed according to OECD Guideline 301 C (Ready Biodegradability: Modified MITI Test (I)). Concentration of inoculum i.e, sludge used was 30 mg/l and initial test substance conc. used in the study was 100 mg/l, respectively. The percentage degradation of test substance was determined to be 3.8, 0.7, 0 and 5.8% by BOD, TOC removal, UV-VIs and HPLC parameter in 14 days. Thus, based on percentage degradation, test chemical is considered to be not readily biodegradable in nature.

 

By considering all the studies mentioned above it can be concluded that test chemical sodium naphthalene-1-sulfonate (CAS no.  130- 14 -3) is not readily biodegradable in nature.